I've had many a great meal throughout my lifetime. However, one which stands out in my mind took place at a nearby restaurant.





It was about 2 years ago, and I was with one of my friends from Best Buddies. We went to a restaurant called The Lucky Platter. We went there for supper. His name is Bill, and he was with me for almost 2-1/2 years. Bill read through the menu, and I made my choice. That evening I chose to have a gouda burger, with a side of smashed potatoes. I ordered an egg cream to drink.





First off I'd like to say a couple of things about the service at The Lucky Platter. Our server that evening was very friendly and attentive. She brought us exactly what we had requested, and she did so quickly. In addition, she talked directly to me rather than Bill when taking my order. After all, I can and do speak for myself. I forget what Bill had to eat and drink. But we both enjoyed our meal. My food came out nice and hot, and it was also fresh. This restaurant bakes their own bread with and without glutin I think. I'm not allergic to glutin, but this is what I've been told. It is very yummy! We did not order dessert that evening, but I had dessert at least once at The Lucky Platter. I've also had breakfast and lunch there with friends. I am not a wheelchair user, but this restaurant can be managed well by those who use wheelchairs.
Breakfast: For breakfast I usually have a bowl of cereal and/or fruit and toast. I also like pop tarts, doughnuts, muffins, and other kinds of pastries. But I've also been known to have omeletts, French toast, or corned-beef hash.





Lunch and dinner: My CIF life-skills tutor Dave helps me shop also for lunch and dinner items. We cook a lot of good things, and these are what I usually have for lunch and/or dinner.




I'm a big fan of dessert. I usually have a cookie or two or three. But sometimes I have other sweet stuff. I have a big sweet tooth!

Addendum

Feb. 26th, 2017 10:52 pm
Hi everybody. In my previous entry I mentioned NFB Newsline, a free service which makes newspapers and some other publications available to people who cannot read standard print or have trouble reading it. However, I neglected to give out the contact information for those who aren't subscribed to this wonderful service but wish to do so. It just might be good if I gave out that info, would it not? So, without further adieu and fanfare here it is. The NFB Newsline team can be reached by dialing (866) 504-7300 , and the dial-in number to log into the service itself is (888) 882-1629 . There is of course a website, for those preferring that method. The website is http://www.nfbnewsline.org . Happy reading and tell them I sent ya!
Hi everyone. I thought it was about time for another update from yours truly. As I write this, I'm just back from a relative's funeral. Not much to discuss there though: just the usual visitation followed by the funeral itself and spending time with family, both immediate and extended.





But I wanted to let everyone know that I am finally! having more of a desire to delve into politics. Why the change of heart, I hear you ask? Well, mainly because people have been bugging me about it. And yes, this includes my family. There are 2 reasons for my lack of involvement in the political process. First off, it has pretty much always been my belief that advocacy just doesn't work a lot of the time. There, I said it! Lol! I think this is particularly true when it comes to disability-rights advocacy, but it applies to other forms of advocacy as well. I've mainly seen it happen throughout Illinois, but I think it's true in a few other states as well. But the other reason I haven't been much for politics--perhaps somewhat related--is the lack of screen reader access to most if not all of these political websites. Enter NFB Newsline! If I can't travel independently very much, I figure I could at least read up on all that's going on. Sure I've heard some of it while listening to the radio, and while watching TV with family and friends. But I have for the most part been tuned out. I think this can be said of at least some other people though.





I have been an NFB Newsline subscriber now for several years. I've never been much of an NFB fan for the most part. While they have indeed done some very good things, a lot of it is just too hard-core for my bones. However, one of the great things that is going on at the NFB is Newsline. Like all other subscribers to the service, I started out only using it over the telephone. But when their website came online, I just had to investigate. So investigate I did, and I became acquainted with their site. But due to a rather hectic schedule, I basically put it on the back burner and kind of forgot about the website. But last week I went on there again. I am happy to report that the team has been hard at work adding great new content, and I for one am super excited to take full advantage of this excellent service. So thank you NFB Newsline team! Your hard work is definitely paying off, for me and for many others.
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. It's a neighborly day in the beautihood.
A lot of great things have happened to me throughout my life. However, one event that stands out for me is getting my MacBook Air. My parents gave it to me for Christmas in 2013. Actually the MacBook Air that I tried out at our local Apple store is the very same one on which I am typing this. I was a Windows user for a very long time, and was rather skeptical about switching. But I'm glad I went with my instincts and my parents' advice. This is a great little machine. Contrary to what some people who have visual impairments think, Apple is very dedicated and committed to making their products accessible to all.

New Year's

Jan. 14th, 2017 06:29 pm
One of my New Year's resolutions for 2017 is to do more pleasure reading. I honestly don't know how well this will go yet, because I have very chatty neighbors. In addition, I have a very busy work schedule which is another story. More on that in another entry. But I'm going to give it my best shot. I read audio books. I download them to my computer, and then copy them to a USB thumb drive. I can't listen to them on my computer though, because they are in a copy-protected format that only works on my digital talking book player. Fortunately, this player is super easy to use. Additionally, I didn't have to pay a single penny for it and the books are free.
Everybody all right over yonder? Good! Then I can shut down for the
night and go to bed.
Happy Halloween too to those who have it today. Please check out this video when you have a moment. http://onj.me/2l8i3
I moved out of my parents' house in August of 2004. At first I thought I was at summer camp, and my neighbors and others around me were all the counselors and other camp staff. Then as I got to know them better I began to realize that they wanted us to become as independent as possible. But they would help us along the way, and that's exactly what has happened to me. I now work with 2 tutors, who were actually never camp counselors but are very good.
I don't know how many people know this, but I had 2 kidney transplants. I have been on a few medications for them. I have seldom forgotten to take one of my medications, and there have also been times when I've run out of one or two of them. Each time this happens, I feel as if my day is missing something. I take meds in the morning and then again in the evening. I've been very good about doing this. As a matter of fact, I have done this for so long that it has just become part of my daily routine. In other words, it is second nature for me and I don't even have to think about it. Some people are not good about taking their medication when needed. I never want to be like one of those people, because I could end up with a lot of problems and I might even die without these meds. I don't think my healthcare team would like it very much if I neglected to take my meds.
I woke up one morning to hear a knock at my bedroom window. This was back in the summer of 2004, not long after I moved into the apartment building where I am today. There was not just one single knock, but about 3 or 4 loud bangs. I found out that evening that the place next-door had been broken into by some guys, and many valuable things were stolen. These included a window air-conditioner and at least one laptop computer. At the time my building was owned by a group which included my parents, and they had a gate installed shortly after the break-in. That evening at the mandatory weekly meeting, we were told to please be very careful. A neighbor friend was awake anyway at that wee hour, and he saw the whole break-in and called the police. Since that time various safety measures have been put into place in and around the building.
Hey everyone. Subject of this entry is pretty self-explanatory. Last night I began the download process for Mac OS Sierra, Apple's latest release for the Mac platform. I let my system do its thing overnight, and this morning when I got out of bed and came in here the installation process was ready to begin. Thus far I have found Mac OS Sierra to be very good in terms of VoiceOver performance and performance in general. I like the enhancements which Apple has made to existing features, and thus far I've found some pretty cool new ones.





The feature I'd specifically like to focus on in this entry is Siri. I had previously heard demonstrations of Siri, and was impressed. I sort of wondered if it would ever be made available on the Mac, so consequently I'm happy to see it on here. I played around with it a bit earlier today, and it seems to be pretty cool. I thought I'd have to train it to call me by name and recognize my voice, but that hasn't been the case at all thus far. I'd still like to play around with it some more. Although I probably won't use Siri as much as some other people, it's nice that the good Cupertino folks have included it and I will definitely make at least some use of it.





As with Apple's prior releases AppleVis has all the nitty-gritty stuff that VoiceOver and Zoom users need to know, so I won't steal their thunder. But what I will say is that Apple has once again demonstrated their true and ongoing commitment to universal accessibility across their product line.
What do I remember about 9/11/01? I was at home by myself. I was still living with my parents at the time, and they were both still working. On that particular Tuesday morning they left early for work, as they always did. My brother was living here in Chicago, and most of my sisters had left for the day. One sister was in the hospital having a procedure done, but she's fine. I woke up, got out of bed, and headed for the shower. After showering, I brushed my teeth and got dressed. I then headed downstairs to the kitchen, where my mom had set out breakfast for me. The kitchen radio was on and tuned to Chicago's public-radio station, as was and still is customary for my parents. I don't recall exactly what time of day I had arrived in the kitchen, but I do remember that it was shortly after the first hijacked airplane hit the Twin Towers. The radio was playing snippets of that, interspersed with a ton of commentary. Then not long after that the second hijacked plane hit, and there was even more commentary with sound bytes. I remember calling my mom at work to see if she and the students were okay, and her colleagues. Then I think I called my dad, or perhaps he called me. Fortunately everybody with whom I was in contact that day was safe and sound. Then I just went about my business. My sister and brother-in-law were not married yet but were still dating. He was actually deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Fortunately I didn't lose any family or friends in the attacks of that dreadful day. But my heart goes out to those who did lose loved ones.
This is just a quick update to let all my dear readers know that I watched my first movie on here yesterday in iTunes. I had previously read a post on #AppleVis with instructions on toggling on/off audio descriptions on the Mac. I always wondered what that setting was exactly for anyway. So I checked the box to turn on these descriptions, and sure enough they came through loud and clear yesterday in the movie. The movie I chose to watch was "The Peanuts Movie," since that was in my iTunes wish list for a little while. Then this morning I discovered that QuickTime Player is another good and accessible option for watching these movies.





I can't agree more with those who assert that now is a good time to be blind/visually impaired. I for one--having been a proud Mac user now for just under 3 years--am so excited to see what Tim Cook and friends come up with next.
Hi everyone. The book which I'm reviewing today wasn't actually recommended to me by anybody. Back in the days when the news was much better and much more upbeat than it has been in recent years, I was a big National Public Radio (NPR) fan. More specifically, I frequently listened to Chicago's NPR member station 91.5 FM WBEZ. This was partly because I tuned in often in my bedroom, but mainly because my parents always had that station on in the kitchen. They still do to this day. I still listen to WBEZ off and on, mainly for the great cultural programming which they offer. So when I saw that this book was available from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, I immediately downloaded and read it. The narrator did a great job with the book.





This one was written by Lisa A. Phillips, and published in 2006 by CDs Books. Ms. Phillips interviewed several public-radio personalities. Those curious about National Public Radio--including how it all started--will certainly want to put this one on your book list. I for one have always enjoyed putting names with voices and vice versa, so I enjoyed this book very much.

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